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  Topic Review (Newest First)
10-22-2007 02:23 PM
azazel1024
Re: Associated Press tests Comcast's file-sharing filter

[quote author=VDesigns link=topic=92385.msg1799083#msg1799083 date=1193060051]
Here's another update!!

Quote:
[size=12pt]Comcast traffic blocking: even more apps, groupware clients affected[/size]
By Eric Bangeman | Published: October 21, 2007 - 11:15PM CT

Last week, we reported on mounting evidence that Comcast is targeting and disrupting BitTorrent traffic on its network. Further digging by interested parties has turned up more indication that BitTorrent isn't the only popular P2P protocol being tampered with by the United States' largest ISP.

Related StoriesEvidence mounts that Comcast is targeting BitTorrent traffic
P2P responsible for as much as 90 percent of all 'Net traffic
The Electronic Frontier Foundation noticed the same sort of packet forging that the AP did (and that Broadband Reports readers did some time ago), and continued its testing to see if other applications are affected. The answer is a disturbing "yes." The results of additional testing done by the EFF indicate Comcast is sending forged reset packets with some Gnutella traffic. When the EFF ran a Gnutella node on a Comcast connection, the forged reset packets disrupted communication between the nodes.

What's particularly insidious about Comcast's packet forging is that it's transparent to both its customers and those on the opposite ends of the connection. Applications such as BitTorrent and Gnutella retain some of their functionality, but they'll also appear to malfunction for no apparent reason.

Even if you accept the argument that all P2P traffic is inherently evil, and that Comcast has the right to disrupt it in order to put a stop to copyright infringement, Comcast's traffic-shaping efforts have apparently extended beyond the realm of P2P and into good old enterprise groupware. Kevin Kanarski, who works as a Lotus Notes messaging engineer, noticed some strange behavior with Lotus Notes when hooked up to a Comcast connection last month.

When Lotus Notes users attempt to send e-mail with larger attachments over Comcast's network, Notes will drop its connection. Instead of a successfully sent e-mail, they're greeted with the error message, "Remote system no longer responding." Kanarski did some digging and has managed to verify that Comcast's reset packets are the culprit. Instead of passing the legitimate e-mail through its network, Comcast's traffic monitoring tool (likely Sandvine) is sitting in the middle, imitating both ends of the connection, and sending reset packets to both client and server.

So far, Comcast has been extremely tight-lipped about what's going on here. The only thing Comcast will admit to is using "the latest technologies to manage our network to provide a quality experience for all Comcast subscribers." From the look of things, that quality experience doesn't extend to BitTorrent, Gnutella, and Lotus Notes—and we wouldn't be surprised to see more applications added to that list.

Whatever its methods and motivations are, Comcast's actions are giving advocates of network neutrality legislation new ammunition. Gigi B. Sohn, president of Public Knowledge, said that Comcast's actions demonstrate the need for legislation. "Add this incident to the Verizon behavior on text messaging and AT&T's censoring of the Pearl Jam concert and it's clear that the policymakers who kept saying, 'Wait until there's a problem' before acting on legislation to keep the Internet free and non-discriminatory have to wait no longer," said Sohn in a statement. "We have a problem, and it's time to act on it."

We've requested comment from Comcast on these latest developments and will update this post as they become available.
The Source: http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post...-affected.html
[/quote]

that actually wouldn't suprise me if that is the problem I am having (it might not be related at all, but it has only poped up in the last 6 months or so).

I think that if it is an issue so large that it is disrupting the services they offer their customers or putting an undue bruden on comcast as an infrastructure provider then Comcast needs to come out and specifically state that they will no longer be supporting peer to peer connections through their network.

As the article states it seems like it is having unintended consequences in attempting to shut down bit torrent and a few others. That is rather unacceptable that they are negatively impacting customers and others who might be passing traffic through their network to conduct legitimate activities.
-Matt
10-22-2007 11:40 AM
fiji mazda3
Re: Associated Press tests Comcast's file-sharing filter

This is one time that I am happy I have Verizon.
10-22-2007 09:34 AM
VDesigns
Re: Associated Press tests Comcast's file-sharing filter

Here's another update!!

Quote:
[size=12pt]Comcast traffic blocking: even more apps, groupware clients affected[/size]
By Eric Bangeman | Published: October 21, 2007 - 11:15PM CT

Last week, we reported on mounting evidence that Comcast is targeting and disrupting BitTorrent traffic on its network. Further digging by interested parties has turned up more indication that BitTorrent isn't the only popular P2P protocol being tampered with by the United States' largest ISP.

Related StoriesEvidence mounts that Comcast is targeting BitTorrent traffic
P2P responsible for as much as 90 percent of all 'Net traffic
The Electronic Frontier Foundation noticed the same sort of packet forging that the AP did (and that Broadband Reports readers did some time ago), and continued its testing to see if other applications are affected. The answer is a disturbing "yes." The results of additional testing done by the EFF indicate Comcast is sending forged reset packets with some Gnutella traffic. When the EFF ran a Gnutella node on a Comcast connection, the forged reset packets disrupted communication between the nodes.

What's particularly insidious about Comcast's packet forging is that it's transparent to both its customers and those on the opposite ends of the connection. Applications such as BitTorrent and Gnutella retain some of their functionality, but they'll also appear to malfunction for no apparent reason.

Even if you accept the argument that all P2P traffic is inherently evil, and that Comcast has the right to disrupt it in order to put a stop to copyright infringement, Comcast's traffic-shaping efforts have apparently extended beyond the realm of P2P and into good old enterprise groupware. Kevin Kanarski, who works as a Lotus Notes messaging engineer, noticed some strange behavior with Lotus Notes when hooked up to a Comcast connection last month.

When Lotus Notes users attempt to send e-mail with larger attachments over Comcast's network, Notes will drop its connection. Instead of a successfully sent e-mail, they're greeted with the error message, "Remote system no longer responding." Kanarski did some digging and has managed to verify that Comcast's reset packets are the culprit. Instead of passing the legitimate e-mail through its network, Comcast's traffic monitoring tool (likely Sandvine) is sitting in the middle, imitating both ends of the connection, and sending reset packets to both client and server.

So far, Comcast has been extremely tight-lipped about what's going on here. The only thing Comcast will admit to is using "the latest technologies to manage our network to provide a quality experience for all Comcast subscribers." From the look of things, that quality experience doesn't extend to BitTorrent, Gnutella, and Lotus Notes—and we wouldn't be surprised to see more applications added to that list.

Whatever its methods and motivations are, Comcast's actions are giving advocates of network neutrality legislation new ammunition. Gigi B. Sohn, president of Public Knowledge, said that Comcast's actions demonstrate the need for legislation. "Add this incident to the Verizon behavior on text messaging and AT&T's censoring of the Pearl Jam concert and it's clear that the policymakers who kept saying, 'Wait until there's a problem' before acting on legislation to keep the Internet free and non-discriminatory have to wait no longer," said Sohn in a statement. "We have a problem, and it's time to act on it."

We've requested comment from Comcast on these latest developments and will update this post as they become available.
The Source: http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post...-affected.html
10-22-2007 09:30 AM
gru
Re: Associated Press tests Comcast's file-sharing filter

[quote author=azazel1024 link=topic=92385.msg1799053#msg1799053 date=1193059431]
If Comcast publishes that is does not allow Peer to Peer transfers for their users that would be one thing, blocking it and not advertising the fact sounds dangerously like a breach of contract with their users in providing them with an internet service and not listing that it is limited in such a manner (I haven't looked closely at my Comcast user agreement to see if it is in there or not, I don't use P2P so I don't care to much).

I have been noticing a lot lately that Comcast is shutting down my downloads (from non-P2P networks). I'll have a few downloads going at once and then they will just stop and I have to restart the downloads (this is with completely legit stuff). I doubt it is related, but it is annoying the hell out of me that maybe 1 in 3 times I am going to lose a download and have to restart (especially when some of the downloads are say 20-30 minutes long because they are big files like demos and stuff).

Something else that I think is a dangerous precedent is that it sounds like they are doing this to a lot of the traffic passing through their network, not just originating or terminating with one of their customers. That pretty much throws the whole net neutrality thing out the window. Controlling what their customers can and cannot do with connections is one thing, controlling what they allow through their network is a completely different and uglier animal.
-Matt
[/quote]

But what if that traffic is putting such a burden on their network that their customers can't get the services as advertised?
10-22-2007 09:23 AM
azazel1024
Re: Associated Press tests Comcast's file-sharing filter

If Comcast publishes that is does not allow Peer to Peer transfers for their users that would be one thing, blocking it and not advertising the fact sounds dangerously like a breach of contract with their users in providing them with an internet service and not listing that it is limited in such a manner (I haven't looked closely at my Comcast user agreement to see if it is in there or not, I don't use P2P so I don't care to much).

I have been noticing a lot lately that Comcast is shutting down my downloads (from non-P2P networks). I'll have a few downloads going at once and then they will just stop and I have to restart the downloads (this is with completely legit stuff). I doubt it is related, but it is annoying the hell out of me that maybe 1 in 3 times I am going to lose a download and have to restart (especially when some of the downloads are say 20-30 minutes long because they are big files like demos and stuff).

Something else that I think is a dangerous precedent is that it sounds like they are doing this to a lot of the traffic passing through their network, not just originating or terminating with one of their customers. That pretty much throws the whole net neutrality thing out the window. Controlling what their customers can and cannot do with connections is one thing, controlling what they allow through their network is a completely different and uglier animal.
-Matt
10-22-2007 08:50 AM
murph182
Re: Associated Press tests Comcast's file-sharing filter

[quote author=VDesigns link=topic=92385.msg1798572#msg1798572 date=1193021118]
They are filtering BitTorrents to stop illegal file downloading [b]any file sharing, including legitimate file transfers that don't break any laws.
[/quote]

t, ftfy
10-22-2007 02:54 AM
ViperKillerWannabe
Re: Associated Press tests Comcast's file-sharing filter

This may not be true in all areas. My brother uses bittorrent on his comcast just fine.
10-21-2007 11:24 PM
Corbs
Re: Associated Press tests Comcast's file-sharing filter

oh yea i've known that for a while. my friend got a letter sent to his house cuz he was DL'ing movies from some site.

hey can we use limewire still?
10-21-2007 10:45 PM
VDesigns
Re: Associated Press tests Comcast's file-sharing filter

[quote author=Corbs link=topic=92385.msg1798506#msg1798506 date=1193019561]
i see that but idk wat it means...
[/quote]

They are filtering BitTorrents to stop illegal file downloading.
10-21-2007 10:19 PM
Corbs
Re: Associated Press tests Comcast's file-sharing filter

i see that but idk wat it means...
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

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