Help with camera setting to take good night shots - FMVperformance.com : The site for all your Ford Mazda and Volvo needs
 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-26-2006, 01:30 PM Thread Starter
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Help with camera setting to take good night shots

Ok I know that this is probably a weird question could anyone in here that is great with a digital camera help me?* I have this camera from Casio * it's the exilm pro 505 , the thing that I need help with is if someone could give me some good settings or advice to help me take a night shot of my undercar lights, everytime I go to take a picture of them it doesn't show up.* If anyone could look and help me or just give me some setting that they have used to take such shots would help me out alot.

Thanks,

Mazda3boi


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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-23-2006, 09:34 PM
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Re: Help with camera setting to take good night shots

Try setting iso at lowest setiing 50 or 100,set exposure at longest times ie.5-15 secs
Do not zoom to keep aperture large to collect all available light. Use a tripod or place the camera on something solid, set the timer for 2 secs. It is IMPORTANT to have the camera steady, at these slow exposure speeds any movement will blur your pictue.
Method 2: Set iso low , reduce flash charge and snap your picture. Good Luck

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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-24-2006, 12:24 AM
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Re: Help with camera setting to take good night shots

what Bman said, Lowest ISO, about half-second to maybe 3 or 4 seconds exposure time, and a TRIPOD IS ABSOLUTELY VITAL! otherwise you get blurries!
Now if you're going to have less light then in the pics I have in the post below, then you'll need a longer exposure time.

http://www.mazda3forums.com/index.php?topic=49690.0 <-- check those out.

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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-24-2006, 03:36 AM
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Re: Help with camera setting to take good night shots

mazda3boi, people might disagree with me, but in addition to the tripod I would also use a remote shutter release if your camera supports it. That way, you're not touching the camera at all while it's exposing and there's less chance of getting some "shake" blur. A remote shutter release is basically a button on a remote control (either wired or wireless) that lets you open the shutter from a distance. Back in the day they were mechanical cables and used to be called "cable releases" -- like on my trusty K-1000. I'm not sure if they make these for non-SLR cameras, but I don't see why not.

You can literally turn night into day on film if you do it right. The black & white shot below looks like it could have been taken some time during the day... except.. isn't it odd that there are street lights on in the background? :-D

It was, in fact, taken at approximately 12AM (midnight) and it was so dark in the park that the sign next to the memorial statue was illegible from that distance. The memorial was difficult to make out as well.

The film here was Fuji Neopan Acros 100. The camera was set to ISO100, f/16-22 (I forget exactly), several seconds exposure. Tripod & cable release were used. The "orbs" of light in the background are streetlights. There are 8 rays of light around each one because that particular lens has an 8-bladed aperture. It looks bad and the text is hard to read because I don't have a good quality flat-bed scanner. My POS feed-style scanner built into my printer adds lines and other artifacts to my images as well. This was one of my first ever photos with a real camera, so don't judge it on composition -- there isn't any :P Artistically, it's crap to look at. I was just experimenting with night shots and was still learning how to take pictures. I just want to show you an example of what's possible with night shots and how it was done for your edification. I'll make way for the pros to step in and tear me to shreds now :P I might learn something, too.



Good luck with your shots. Post them when you're done. :-)


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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-24-2006, 08:24 AM
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Re: Help with camera setting to take good night shots

+1 on the remote shutter suggestion


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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-24-2006, 08:37 AM
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Re: Help with camera setting to take good night shots

Yes, remote shutter is great, but a lot of cameras don't have that feature. That's why bman suggested (and I've had great results with) the 2 sec timer. With the timer setting, it ensures that the camera has enough time to settle down before beginning the long exposure.



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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-24-2006, 10:28 AM
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Re: Help with camera setting to take good night shots

Yup yup, the timer will do about the same thing as a remote. It just has to be long enough so that the vibration of you touching the camera is gone before the shutter releases.

Bracket your exposures...take many pics changing the length of exposure accross the range.

You may want to experiment with 'light painting' where you basically trace the car with a flashlight while the long shutter timer is still opened. Would balance the under lighting against the car if it's dark enough.
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-24-2006, 10:54 AM
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Re: Help with camera setting to take good night shots

Oh that painting idea is great! I've gotta give that a try some time.



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